Kerouac’s Collaborative Circle: Indirect Collaboration

You may think that all you need to write good books is will-power, a stellar idea, and a cave. You may think that hiding in a cubby hole with a full-battery-power laptop is all there is to turning out a tale worth telling. Perhaps you’re a poet who thinks that a lonely hill, some loose... Continue Reading →

Kerouac, Burroughs, and Direct Collaboration

Kerouac, Burroughs, and Direct Collaboration Direct collaboration, as opposed to indirect collaboration (which we'll talk about next week) is where a writer works directly with one or more people on a specific piece. Jess Weaver and I developing the Christmas play for Springs Ensemble Theatre's winter show is an example. Shameless self-promotion moment: Writers working with... Continue Reading →

Rapture, Blister, Burn

Opening tonight at Springs Ensemble Theatre!! Rapture, Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo is sharply-funny (if you like that sarcastic, smart kinda humor...which I do). It's about Catherine, who has gone off and become a Neil-DeGrasse-Tyson-style academic of women's studies. But she comes home to the small New England town where she grew up to take... Continue Reading →

The Kerouac-Ginsberg Letters: You Have to Write More than You Think

Jack Kerouac attended Columbia University for a while. It was there he met and started hanging around with some other names you may know – most notable fellow novelist William S. Burroughs and the poet Allen Ginsberg. Because we can’t talk Kerouac without talking about his crew, we get a two-for-one mentorship deal! Starting in... Continue Reading →

Introducing: Writing Desk II

A couple months ago, the new owners of the Damon Runyon Theatre in Pueblo gave us SET ensemble members an opportunity to dig through their stuff (and if you've ever been in a community theatre, you understand there's always a TON of stuff) and take away whatever we wanted. So we went down to P-town... Continue Reading →

The Great American Novel and Jack Kerouac

The Great American Novel. Books as varied as Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath, Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, and, more recently, Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom have all been considered for the title of Great American... Continue Reading →

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